Noteworthy News – Jan. 18, 2017

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Concrete customers can now track their deliveries in real time, Canada’s oil exports to the U.S. may be in trouble due to a proposed border adjustment tax and the Alberta Motor Transport Association is advocating for better snow removal in the face of dangerous driving conditions for truckers. Stay in the know with our compilation of top stories that could have an impact on your company or your industry. Here’s this week’s Noteworthy News:

Noteworthy News – January 18, 2017

  1. A budding new partnership between Mack Trucks North America and WheresMyConcrete allows customers to track their concrete deliveries in real time. The announcement was made at the 2017 World of Concrete conference in Las Vegas and the technology is already available for ready-mix trucks. Via Truck News.
  2. The incoming Trump administration in the U.S. is raising a few eyebrows here in Canada. A potential border adjustment tax could prevent Canadian companies from shipping oil to our American neighbours. Canada currently exports about 3 million barrels of oil to the U.S. a day. Via the Financial
  3. Scotiabank published its Global Outlook document this week, predicting that 2017 will be the most prosperous year for the global economy since 2014. The financial institution also believes that Canada’s growth will accelerate over the course of the next two years. Via Canadian
  4. An assessment is underway to figure out how much the damage from the Fort McMurray wildfires will cost. The number has already reached $9.5 billion and the investigation is still underway. The devastating natural disaster destroyed 1,800 single family homes along with numerous businesses and other buildings in the communities it affected. Via Canadian Business News.
  5. The Alberta Motor Transport Association is asking Alberta Transportation for better snow removal policies to be put in place. With the harsh winter weather this year, it’s been difficult for truck drivers to see the edge of the road causing them to veer too far over. The thick, brown slush has been splashing onto their windshields as well making it very difficult to see. Via Today’s Trucking.

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